1) These indefinite pronouns are always singular and should be associated with a singular verb: any, anything, each, either, either, neither, everyone, everybody, everything, someone, somebody, something, anyone, anyone, no one, ndyobo, nothing, one. If a compound subject is connected by «or» or «nor», look at the subject closest to the verb and let the verb match that part of the subject. 5) Some subjects refer to one thing, but take an abbreviated plural (examples: scissors, pants) 2) These indeterminate pronouns are always plural and should be paired with a plural dish: little, a lot 10) Neither the tray nor the cups have been removed. (The cups are closer, so the verb is plural) Subjects (who or what it is) and verbs (plot or state of being) must agree. 2) You take the school bus in the afternoon. (plural subject; Plural verb) 4) Note that some topics may appear plural, but are singular because they relate to one thing or only one amount of something (examples: math, mumps, short stories) 8) Katie or three girls go to the office. (Girls are closer, so the verb is plural) 1) It walks 4 km a day. (Singular subject; singular verb) 5) None of the marbles are rolled from the circle. 6) One of the nails stands. (one is singular) 3) For some indeterminate pronouns (some, all, none), it depends on the element to which the pronoun refers.

4) Some of the money is missing. (Singular silver is singular). . . .